“Oregon Rivers” Book

In 1988, motivated by Oregon’s landmark river legislation, Larry Olson began making photographs for a book to celebrate our rivers. Oregon Rivers, which joins his photographs of Oregon’s wild and scenic river system with essays by John Daniel, was published in 1997. Making these photographs provided Larry the opportunity for a long-term immersion in intimate landscapes.

"I made repeated visits to all of the fifty-six designated wild and scenic rivers in Oregon, hiking along (and often in) the rivers, roaming up and down the canyons and drainages surrounding them, and seeking to capture on film the contours and facets of landscape that make up a river system. I also kayaked and canoed many of the rivers in order to visit remote sections.

"This book is dedicated to the individuals and organizations who care about Oregon rivers and work to protect them." - Larry N. Olson & John Daniel

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Oregon Rivers captures the beauty of Oregon's designated wild and scenic rivers. Landscape photographer Larry N. Olson and noted environmental journalist John Daniel have created a work of visual artistry and literary insight.

Noted environmentalist David Brower had this to say about Larry & John's book...

"I see from this book that Oregonians have been doing a good job of protecting wild rivers. You're rich with rivers. Some of them I know, and these photographs have shown me many others - many portraits of water's wildness and a fine variety of landscape sculpture, Northwest-style.

"You don't need it but will you take some advice from a Californian who has been around for a while? Cherish these rivers. Witness for them. Enjoy there unimprovable purpose as you sense it, and let those rivers that you never visit comfort you with the assurance that they are there, doing wonderfully what they have always done. 

"Keep your rivers flowing as they will, and you will continue to know the most important of all freedoms - the boundless scope of the human mind to contemplate wonders, and to begin to understand their meaning."

David Brower, Former Sierra Club Director

"I don't know that my pictures will ever make people change the way they live, but it'll make them want to go out and hike, to go see these rivers for themselves. - Larry N. Olson

"I don't know that my pictures will ever make people change the way they live, but it'll make them want to go out and hike, to go see these rivers for themselves". - Larry N. Olson

"Oregon Rivers is a stunning tribute to the beauty and splendor of our state's incomparable rivers. From humble Joseph Creek in the Northeast corner of Oregon to the mighty Rogue River in the Southwest, these treasures are irreplaceable. For everyone who fishes, swims, floats, paddles, or daydreams in or around our rivers, this book offers inspiration to care for and preserve them for all of our citizens and for the generations to come."kitzhaber1

John A. Kitzhaber, Governor of Oregon.

 

Additional thanks go out to John Laursen of Press-22, for his friendship, enthusiasm, advise and bookmaking skills which have been invaluable to me. He saw my photographs at the beginning and guided me through the end. I have admired his work for many years and I am proud to have had him design the book.


Haida Gwaii Sea Kayak Trip 2011

Woman relaxes in hot spring at Hot Springs Island, Haida Gwaii, BC Canada

Woman relaxes in hot spring at Hot Springs Island, Haida Gwaii, BC Canada

In the summer of 2011 Larry Olson and I did a 3-week sea kayak trip along the shores of Haida Gwaii.  Larry's fascination with Haida Gwaii began more than 25 years ago when, as a young sea kayaker, he began to dream of paddling her waters. Remote, wild, and relatively undiscovered, the islands represent a lifetime destination for the experienced paddler. Haida Gwaii’s location in the North Pacific makes it difficult to reach so visitor numbers are relatively low as compared to other Canadian gems. Add to this dangerous waters, unpredictable weather and a very short summer season and we were among a small number of sea kayakers and sailboaters who made the effort to visit Haida Gwaii that summer.

Kayaker paddles through thick sea fog at Skincuttle Inlet.

Kayaker paddles through thick sea fog at Skincuttle Inlet.

A week into the trip we decided to attempt a 3-mile crossing of Skincuttle Inlet.  Stepping out of the tent that morning a thick sea fog and eerie silenced surrounded us. We could barely make out shoreline only 50 feet in the distance. As luck would have it, we had used our compass to set a bearing to our destination the night before. 130 degrees would get us to our desired destination. 10 degrees off this bearing and we’d be in danger of missing the point altogether and drifting into the dangerous waters of Hecate Strait.  An hour later, with no weather change in sight, we glued our eyes to the compass and pushed off into the milky abyss.

Gem-like green eel grass in a British Columbia , Pacific Ocean tide pool.

Gem-like green eel grass in a British Columbia , Pacific Ocean tide pool.

At Hot Springs Island, it came as no surprise that this island was a spiritual site of the Haida people. From our perch above the tide line we gazed toward snow-capped peaks cloaked in shifting fog layers and small islands graced the dappled water as far as one could see.

Excerpt from Celine Fitzmaurice's Haida Gwaii story. For more photographic adventures, visit my blog. Larry

Kayakers camp on the shores of Haida Gwaii.

Kayakers camp on the shores of Haida Gwaii.


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